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In case you missed it

• 19.01.2017

Empathy and perception with the composer Sky Macklay.

• 06.03.2019

An Interview with Laurie Anderson

, • 28.06.2018

Patricia Alessandrini finds identity in sound.

• 02.08.2018

In issue #114, art confronts society.

• 28.07.2016

Why aren’t we discussing structural inequality in classical music?

, , • 12.05.2016

The violinist Patricia Kopatchinskaja is fed up.

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Video of the Week

The Complete 555 Domenico Scarlatti Harpsichord Sonatas

A person who attempts to listen to all of Scarlatti’s 550 harpsichord sonatas may come to feel that they all eventually become indistinguishable. Enter the glorious literalism of the internet: here is each piece played at the same time, in the version of Scott Ross, resulting in a texture that commenters compare to Penderecki, Messiaen, Ligeti, Merzbow, and Metal Machine Music. Allow us one more analogy: this is the musical version of Soylent, compressing a composer’s life work into an oddly compelling beige/gray smoothie sludge.

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Audio of the Week

“Losing Touch,” by Edmund Campion

“Losing Touch,” by the American composer Edmund Campion, a student of Gérard Grisey, has something of his mentor’s pristine microtonal rigor, combined with the West Coast influences of Harry Partch. Performed on vibraphone here by Fernando Rocha.

Editor’s picks

• 09.11.2017

A visual approach to the art of music.

• 26.01.2017

King Ludwig II’s Wagnerian castle and a lineage of obsession.

• 07.12.2017

Feminist criticism by one of our staff writers.

• 05.07.2018

Salvatore Sciarrino wants everything to connect.

An interview with Brian Ferneyhough.

Kampela on Ferneyhough’s “La terre est un homme” and other strange, beautiful music.

“When you follow Ferneyhough, well, you are going to be alone with your music.”

British musicians, including the composer Charlotte Bray, reckon with the triggering of Article 50.

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3 weeks ago

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18.01.2020 • 02:50

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#pieces

...we’re reading, listening to, and putting together.

3 years ago •

A thoughtful response to our Klezmer playlist from issue #56.

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3 years ago •

Win a staff writer gig at VAN.

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3 years ago •

Issue #54.5 has some of our favorite articles from 2017 so far, for free.

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Stream of the Day

International Telekom Beethoven Competition
Orchestra final

The 8th International Telekom Beethoven Competition will conclude with the orchestra finale at the Telekom Forum Bonn. Together with the Beethoven Orchestra Bonn, the three finalists will interpret one of Beethoven’s piano concertos under the direction of General Music Director Dirk Kaftan. Which piano concertos will be heard, however, will be decided shortly before the finale: all participating pianists will prepare two piano concertos. But which work is interpreted by which finalist is decided by lot…

The Telekom Beethoven Competition Bonn, for young pianists, pursues two central objectives: It is primarily dedicated to promoting young talent and contributes to keeping Ludwig van Beethoven’s great legacy alive and active in his hometown of Bonn.