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In case you missed it

• 24.05.2016

The liberation of the Syrian city of Palmyra from ISIS by Russian forces called for a celebration. But this was no ordinary open air concert.

• 29.09.2016

Selling the manuscript of Mahler’s Second Symphony.

• 17.03.2016

A new staging of George Benjamin’s opera “Written On Skin.”

• 30.03.2017

What gets lost when orchestras share their conductors.

, , • 08.02.2018

Susan McClary wants to debate the music.

• 15.09.2016

Wolfgang Rihm teaches the Lucerne Festival’s Composer Seminar.

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Audio of the Week

Parker Ramsay plays Bach’s Goldberg Variations, BWV 988: Variation 1

Recorded in the unique acoustic of King’s College Chapel in Cambridge, England, this harp transcription of the Goldberg Variations is performed by outstanding young American musician Parker Ramsay. It was created by Parker in part to make a statement about the harp: “I wanted to show the world that the harp is an instrument of beauty, sincerity and transcendence, standing alongside the keyboards and string instruments as a worthy vehicle for the music of J S Bach.”
Available 18 September 2020.

 Parker Ramsay – Bach: Goldberg Variations, BWV 988: Variation 1 (Arr. for Harp)

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Video of the Week

Parker Ramsay plays Bach’s Goldberg Variations, BWV 988: Variation 1

presented by    

Recorded in the unique acoustic of King’s College Chapel in Cambridge, England, this harp transcription of the Goldberg Variations is performed by outstanding young American musician Parker Ramsay. It was created by Parker in part to make a statement about the harp: “I wanted to show the world that the harp is an instrument of beauty, sincerity and transcendence, standing alongside the keyboards and string instruments as a worthy vehicle for the music of J S Bach.”
Available 18 September 2020.

Editor’s picks

• 16.05.2019

How the artist manager Xenia Evangelista converts hope into cash.

• 28.09.2017

How Shostakovich changed the improviser Liz Durette.

• 30.11.2017

An interview with Jean Rondeau.

• 23.11.2017

Jürg Frey wants to purify his sounds.

An interview with Brian Ferneyhough.

Kampela on Ferneyhough’s “La terre est un homme” and other strange, beautiful music.

“When you follow Ferneyhough, well, you are going to be alone with your music.”

British musicians, including the composer Charlotte Bray, reckon with the triggering of Article 50.

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23.10.2020 • 11:17

RT @violanorth:MORE 👏🏼 COMPOSER 👏🏼 PICS 👏🏼 IN 👏🏼 BARNYARDS https://t.co/zSlb3pPzQp

23.10.2020 • 10:19

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23.10.2020 • 10:18

@Numinousmusic You're crediting us with way too much sportsball intelligence.

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...we’re reading, listening to, and putting together.

3 years ago •

A thoughtful response to our Klezmer playlist from issue #56.

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3 years ago •

Win a staff writer gig at VAN.

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3 years ago •

Issue #54.5 has some of our favorite articles from 2017 so far, for free.

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Stream of the Day

International Telekom Beethoven Competition
Orchestra final

The 8th International Telekom Beethoven Competition will conclude with the orchestra finale at the Telekom Forum Bonn. Together with the Beethoven Orchestra Bonn, the three finalists will interpret one of Beethoven’s piano concertos under the direction of General Music Director Dirk Kaftan. Which piano concertos will be heard, however, will be decided shortly before the finale: all participating pianists will prepare two piano concertos. But which work is interpreted by which finalist is decided by lot…

The Telekom Beethoven Competition Bonn, for young pianists, pursues two central objectives: It is primarily dedicated to promoting young talent and contributes to keeping Ludwig van Beethoven’s great legacy alive and active in his hometown of Bonn.