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In case you missed it

• 18.01.2016

The violinist Christian Tetzlaff goes deeper.

• 18.01.2018

On opera, voices, politics, and violence.

• 08.06.2017

Why studies questioning the Stradivarius myth are so persuasive.

• 29.09.2016

An interview with Helmut Lachenmann.

• 01.02.2018

Nico Muhly on notes and rhythms.

• 17.05.2018

Niels Rønsholdt sees beauty in the attempt.

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Video of the Week

The Complete 555 Domenico Scarlatti Harpsichord Sonatas

A person who attempts to listen to all of Scarlatti’s 550 harpsichord sonatas may come to feel that they all eventually become indistinguishable. Enter the glorious literalism of the internet: here is each piece played at the same time, in the version of Scott Ross, resulting in a texture that commenters compare to Penderecki, Messiaen, Ligeti, Merzbow, and Metal Machine Music. Allow us one more analogy: this is the musical version of Soylent, compressing a composer’s life work into an oddly compelling beige/gray smoothie sludge.

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Audio of the Week

“Losing Touch,” by Edmund Campion

“Losing Touch,” by the American composer Edmund Campion, a student of Gérard Grisey, has something of his mentor’s pristine microtonal rigor, combined with the West Coast influences of Harry Partch. Performed on vibraphone here by Fernando Rocha.

Editor’s picks

, • 14.04.2016

The formative sounds and experiences of composer Pauline Oliveros.

• 19.04.2018

The eclectic influences on classical music, in issue #101.

• 17.08.2017

Concert Hall Hopping with Kate Wagner of McMansion Hell.

• 04.08.2016

Science fiction and Morton Feldman’s “Three Voices.”

An interview with Brian Ferneyhough.

Kampela on Ferneyhough’s “La terre est un homme” and other strange, beautiful music.

“When you follow Ferneyhough, well, you are going to be alone with your music.”

British musicians, including the composer Charlotte Bray, reckon with the triggering of Article 50.

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2 weeks ago

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“I don’t think Jessye Norman feels any separation. She’s there to be fully absorbed in the music.” For Teju Cole, Jessye Norman was a model for how to listen.

She died last night at 74.Richard Strauss - Vier letzte Lieder (Four Last Songs) IV. Im Abendrot ( Joseph von Eichendorff) Jessye Norman - soprano Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, l982 co...
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#pieces

...we’re reading, listening to, and putting together.

2 years ago •

A thoughtful response to our Klezmer playlist from issue #56.

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2 years ago •

Win a staff writer gig at VAN.

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2 years ago •

Issue #54.5 has some of our favorite articles from 2017 so far, for free.

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